TExES Prep: Best Study Method To Pass

Effective TExES test prep starts with understanding competencies you’re required to demonstrate in the test center. Then discover how to leverage your learning style to master the content and get a passing score.

You must find out which tests you need to take as early as possible in your teacher education program.

Why?…

…So that you start gathering the best preparation materials and get advice from colleagues that will make your study easier, less frustrating and ensure a passing score.

Do You Know What Exam You Need TExES Test Prep For?

If you’re not sure what exams you need to take, ask an authority in your college of education, Texas Education Agency (TEA) or State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) office.

Most Texas educator licensing candidates must pass at least two Texas Examinations of Educator Standards tests:

1.) A content or subject exam and

2.) The Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities or PPR examination.

The content exams evaluate your mastery on a specific subject. It’s best to check the SBEC website on the specific exam you are taking because the TExES prep manuals will list the sources you could use in your review.

As you know, there are exams specifically for physical education or special education. There are also content exams for a specific grade level like the Generalist 4-8 or the Generalist EC-6 as well as the professional certificate exams for those aspiring to be a principal or a school counselor.

Meanwhile, the PPR assessment like the EC-12 is a teaching and professional requirements evaluation.

Where To Begin Your TExES Exam Prep

The starting point for point-pumping study and practice sessions is to gather all your preparation manuals, flashcards and TExES test questions you have to see the amount of content and the degree of difficulty that you need to study.

Estimate how many hours you need to prep for the TExES exam in order to master all the required test proficiencies and get a passing score. You know you can’t study effectively in huge 6-9 hour blocks of time. It’s not likely you could schedule such massive sessions into your daily schedule anyway. Therefore, calculate how many days and weeks of studying you need between now and your upcoming test day.

It’s best to do this activity on a large calendar so you can map out a study schedule and see it visually and conceptually. Don’t try to plan and organize all this in your head. At least use a sheet of paper as the process will double your brain power and aid your thinking.

Remember doing TExES test preparation a little each day will increase your score more than a few long marathon sessions a week before your exam day where you’ll likely forget most of what you studied.

The ideal time to start preparing is 8 weeks before your testing date. However, some candidates have achieved a passing score in less time. How long you need to study is determined by how productivity of your TExES test prep sessions, your background (e.g. college major) and whether you’re a good test taker.

If you find most of your preparation book content a simple review of what you learned and remember from your college classes then obviously you won’t need a full 8 weeks to prep. On the other hand, if you have been away from the classroom for a longer time, find your college classes did not cover a lot of the test content, you’ll likely need 8 weeks of preparation time.

TExES Prep Red Flag To Watch Out For

A big red flag that you have a lot of exam practice and review to do is if you have forgotten Bloom, Piaget, or Erikson to name just a few of the theories that are listed in the study guide. If this is you then start preparing at least 8 weeks before your exam date for a minimum of 1 hour per day.
Don’t try and cut corners or procrastinate your studying for last few weeks before your exam date. If you do, you greatly increase your chances of failure.

What Kind Of Method To Prep For The TExES Exam Best Fits Your Learning Style?

While you should use a wide variety of resources in your review time, be aware of how you most effectively learn and review information. Here’s a list of some of the best test prep resources to help you pass the TExES:

• One TExES test prep manual is available and downloadable for free at the ETS website. You shouldn’t expect the official website and test developers are going to give away real test questions. However, they’re the makers of the exam. Getting their free materials is a good starting point for your exam practice.

• The TExES prep books are numerous for some content, but may be hard to find for the others. One preparation resource that has study guides, practice tests and tutoring for most TExES exams is at: TExES study guides.

• Join a teacher’s forum like “A-Z Teacher Stuff” where you will get help from fellow candidates by tips, get recommendations on study guides, etc. Some of the people on these forums are already tests passers who want to help you! Just don’t fall into the trap of spending hours there when you need crack open your preparation materials.

Do You Learn More Effectively In A Group Or Social Setting?

• Many universities and private companies offer the TExES test prep courses for those who wish to benefit with a more structured type of review. Some are free and some cost hundreds of dollars. Some are good while others are lame, dull and not a productive use of your time.

If offered in a classroom set-up, the advantage is that you can easily ask questions and get the answers from the teachers who should be certified Texas educators. You can enroll in a specific class that covers specific exams like the Generalist 4-8 or Mathematics.

• Joining a TExES exam prep study group may be an effective preparation method for you (and inexpensive). This is especially true if you learn better in an interactive and social environment and it’s very hard for you to lock yourself up in a room by yourself for hours without human contact.

A small group of educator candidates who all share the mission of passing this exam can be powerful. Often such a group creates a “mastermind” where for example, the power of 4 group members isn’t just 4. It multiples itself and goes to the power of 16 through the power of multiple brains focused on a goal and working together.

You can often include find a former test takers who passed your specific exam who will sit in one of your sessions. He/she can give you valuable tips and insights that can help re-energize your TExES prep program and you raise your score to passing level.

Decide which TExES prep method you can leverage starting right now that will help you the most. Then use it over and over again to propel you to exam success. Make Start and take action right now.